Bishop's Children Dahlia

More Views

Organic Bishop's Children Dahlia Seeds

Dahlia variabilis
Single-petaled blooms in red, pink, and yellow adorn burgundy foliage. 42" tall. Start early.
Note: Low Germ
Art Pack, 50 seeds
Product ID# , Certified Organic by NOFA-NY LLC , Grown in the Northeast
$3.95

Currently unavailable.

Quick Facts
Days to Germination 5-10 days
Days to Maturity 70 days
Planting Depth 3/4"
Spacing in Row 18"
Spacing Between Rows 18-24"
Height at Maturity 36-48 inches
Width at Maturity 30 inches
Detailed Product Info

Though dahlias are most often grown from tubers, seed-grown dahlias are more fun. Why? Because dahlias are octoploids, meaning they have four times as many chromosomes as most other flowers. This complexity means that seed-grown dahlias often show traits that vary widely from their parents: leaf shape, plant size, bloom color—all are liberal variations on the family theme. The real joy in this is that if you identify one plant that you really love, you can harvest and store the tubers for the winter and grow an identical plant next year. Congrats: you're a plant breeder!

Bishop's Children blooms in mix of red, burgundy, magenta and the occasional yellow flower on foliage that ranges from purple tinged to deep burgundy.

Growing Instructions

A mix of red, burgundy, magenta and the occasional yellow flower on purple foliage. Transplant when seedlings are 3-4 inches soil ammended with plenty of compost. Plants reach 48 inches high. Each plant produces many single petaled flowers. This variety is similar to growing zinnias from seed.

About the Art and Artist
Artwork by Kellie Cox. Art and horticulture are Kellie’s passions. As a young girl tending the family garden through her time at the University of Delaware acquiring a dual degree in landscape horticulture and plant science, art and nature remain an ever-present inspiration. She values the botanical diversity surrounding us and has always sought a means to share her enthusiasm. Botanicals, both in their simplicity and complexity, provide an endless supply of subjects to paint and learn from. As time passed and Kellie’s passions evolved, she sought larger physical areas to paint and expand upon. She envisioned entire walls exploding with colorful and bold botanical art on most every building she passed. With her growing love for plants and art, she moved down to Washington, D.C. to pursue a career in historic gardening and art. She currently works as the Director of Buildings, Gardens and Grounds at Tudor Place Historic House and Gardens, a beautiful 5.5 acre historic garden located in Georgetown. Kellie works to continue the preservation and restoration of the 200 year old gardens and house, while pursuing her other love of art through garden art classes and mural installations throughout the city.