Hairy Vetch Cover Crop

Organic Hairy Vetch Cover Crop Seeds

Fast, hardy nitrogen fixer

Vicia villosa
Suppress weeds, add nitrogen with this speedy grower!
Winter hardy cover crop, putting on lots of quick, green growth in spring on sprawling long vines. The thick mats of vines are great at adding organic matter, and are excellent for weed suppression.
Product ID# , Certified Organic by NOFA-NY LLC

Currently unavailable. Full catalog will return by January 1st, 2018.

Quick Facts
Days to Germination 7 to 14 days
Days to Maturity 60-300 days
Planting Depth 1 inch
Spacing in Row 3 inches
Spacing Between Rows 3 inches
Height at Maturity 30 inches
Width at Maturity sprawling vines up to 12'
Detailed Product Info

Hairy Vetch can be planted in either early spring or late-summer/fall and is winter hardy, putting on lots of quick, green growth in spring on sprawling long vines. The thick mats of vines are great at adding organic matter, and are excellent for weed suppression. Said to be one of the best nitrogen-fixers, reportedly more efficient than peas.The plants will thrive even in acidic soils. It is best to mow hairy vetch just as blooming begins, for optimal nitrogen fixation, and to ensure that the plants die before setting seed, as vetch can become a weed if allowed to re-seed.The mowed plants can be left in place as a natural mulch for no-till planting, or incorporated into the soil for organic matter.
Sow by early fall (September in zone 5) for plants that will over winter and put on lush growth in early spring. Seed a nurse crop such as oats for better winter survival.

Garden Pack: 1/8 pound, sows roughly 125 square feet
Homestead Pack: ¼ pound, sows roughly 300 square feet
Farm Pack: 1 pound, sows roughly 2,000 square feet

Growing Instructions

Sow in spring, or in late summer through early fall. To broadcast: Spread evenly on a well-prepared bed and hoe in to a depth of 1 inch. To sow in rows: Sow seeds 1 inch deep, 3 inches apart, in rows spaced 3 inches apart, and cover well. Mow hairy vetch just as blooming begins, for optimal nitrogen fixation, and to ensure that the plants die before setting seed, as vetch can become a weed if allowed to re-seed.The mowed plants can be left in place as a natural mulch for no-till planting, or incorporated into the soil for organic matter.